Littleborough’s History

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For details of the Battle Passchendaele & soldiers who died  see here

For available Photographs please contact

Private Enoch Margerison

Enoch was born on Haslingden in 1880 and lived there and in Blackpool before moving to Littleborough where in he was boarding at 9 George Street whilst working as a Cotton Operative Weaver and was member of the Park Bowling Club. 37 year old Private 14802 Enoch Margerison, 6th Batt Kings Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment) died Sunday 14th October 1917 at the Blackpool Sanatorium and is interred in Grave Number C 1050 Haslingden (Holden Hall) Cemetery, Lancashire with the Bowling Club sending a wreath. Private Enoch Margerison is remembered on Littleborough Cenotaph as well as being included on the Haslingden Roll of Honour. The Rochdale Observer for 20th October 1917 carried a report on his internment in Grave Road Cemetery, Haslingden on Tuesday. Enoch had also seen service in Gallipoli and Mesopotamia.


Thomas Brown - Royal Navy.

Thomas was born in Pendleton and was the son of Mr William Brown of Rochdale (previously of Smithybridge) and the husband of Mrs Edith Brown, 13 Blackstock Street, Chorlton on Medlock, Manchester. In 1901 he was living at 15 Little Clegg Rd, Smithy Bridge and was a Fitters Apprentice serving his time as an engine fitter at Messrs Petrie’s, Whitehall Street, Rochdale. Tom enlisted in 1911. On the 11th March 1917 Tom stood as Godfather to his sister’s son who was baptised “Archie” after his brother who was killed in action on 14th September 1916. Tom had received his brother Archie’s cigarette case and watch. 35 year old Thomas Brown, holder of a long service and good conduct medal and an Engine Room Artificer 3rd Class M/3717 was drowned in the North Sea with the loss of H.M.S. torpedo boat destroyer Mary Rose in a sea battle with German Cruisers Brummer and Bremse whilst protecting a 12 merchantship convoy on Wednesday 17th October 1917. Thomas is remembered on the St Andrew’s Memorial Card and War Memorial and on panel 23 Chatham Naval Memorial, Kent. The death of Tom was described in St Andrew’s Parish Church Magazine as adding “Our deep sympathy is with Mr Brown and his family in the loss of two such gallant brothers. May they rest in peace”.  The Rochdale Observer on 3rd August 1918 noted that St Andrew’s Church would tomorrow hold a Guild Anniversary service including a Memorial service for those Guild members who had fallen in the 4th year of the war. A month later, on 14th September 1918 both Archibald and Tom were remembered in the In Memoriam column of the Rochdale Observer.


Corporal Christopher James Kerr

Christopher was born in Rochdale around 1891 and in 1911 was living with his parents Hall and Hannah and family at 32 Calderbrook Terrace, Littleborough with Christopher employed as a Weaver of Cotton Cloth. Prior to enlisting in Rochdale in February 1915, Christopher was employed in the warehouse at Fothergill and Harvey’s at Rock Nook Mill. He was actively associated with the Littleborough Victoria Street Wesleyan Chapel where for many years he was a teacher in the school, By Wednesday 21st November 1917 his parents living at 64 Todmorden Road, Summit had been officially informed that their only son, 26 year old Corporal 15639 Christopher James Kerr, 1st Bn Devonshire Regiment, had been killed in action on May 29th October 1917 and is remembered on the Littleborough Victoria Street Wesleyan Chapel and Ebenezer Chapel Summit War Memorials, Littleborough Cenotaph and on Tyne Cot Memorial, Zonnebeke, Belgium. Christopher had previously been wounded on two occasions, gassed once and in April 1917 he also narrowly escaped death by drowning when a hospital ship he was on was torpedoed. Roll of Honour included in the Rochdale Observer for 24th November 1917 included family sentiments.

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